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The area around Slusegaard is interesting in many ways.

This is where the geographical nodal point is situated - i.e. where
15th meridian east intersects the 55th parallel north. At this point,
the sun is due south at 12 noon.

The nodal point is marked with a granite stone and is described in
more detail at the site. The area also features rare and interesting
flora. For those interested in geology, many fossils have been found
in the layers of shale along the stream.

The entire area is preserved and open to the public and it is also a scenic area for walks.

In the spring of 2014, the area will be grazed by sheep, lambs and horses as a form of natural conservation.

Slusegaard in brief

Drop by Café Slusegaard, where you can read and learn more about this.


Read more about our café here >>

Always ready to serve delicious treats …

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Slusegaard: where Oleåen Stream flows into the Baltic

UTM 0499840 / 6094914

N 55 00 04.0 / E 014 59 51.0

Slusegaard is situated near the mouth of Oleåen Stream and, as the name indicates (sluse = sluice), a sluice was once located here as part of a watermill.

Øleåen Stream is the longest waterway on the island of Bornholm, and although many sections of its meandering course have been straightened, its total length is still 22.2 km from its source in Ølene Bog to where it flows into the Baltic Sea near Slusegaard.

Tyrkelegaard farm with watermill, 1750

According to "Hammer's Map" from the 1750s, Slusegaard was once named "Tÿrkelegaard" but it is also referred as "Törkelegaard" farm in a few surviving documents signed by a county administrator named Urne.

Source material also describes how the farm was once named "Tyrkesegaard", "Tyrkelsegaard" and "Terkelegaard", probably referring to the male name of Thorkil or Thyrkil. According to church records dating from 1662, the farm was owned by Anders Torckelsen, a name written as "Anders Terkildssen" in a cadastre dated 1696!

The Slusegaard watermill and trout house facility

Modern residents of Bornholm associate Slusegaard (freehold farm no. 15 of many names, in the Parish of Pedersker) with its watermill and the rather large mill pond with associated weirs or sluices, the trout breeding house and a small spring house.

The watermill existed already in the mid-1700s, whereas the trout house dates from the 1860s.

The entire facility was listed in 1956, and is now one of the island's three-star sights of interest for permanent residents and tourists alike. Yet Slusegaard's cultural history relating to these facilities is not the only drawing card of the site.

In the final section of Øleåen Stream before it flows into the Baltic Sea, the waterway cuts through cyrtograptus shale.

Also, Iron Age settlements were once located in the old coastal embankments, and over a number of years - from 1958 to 1964 - 1,400 Iron Age graves were thoroughly excavated by archaeologists.

The then Crown Princess Margrethe took part in these excavations in 1962 and 1964.

The botanical features of this dry sand dune landscape are unusual. For instance, in early spring, you might have the good fortune to see a small, unimpressive plant - the Pearlwort Spurrey (Spergula morisonii) - which has one of its few natural habitats in Denmark right here.

Geographical nodal point near Slusegaard

Finally, the site became famous in modern times when an engineer, after checking his textbook atlas, noted that the markings for 15th meridian east and the 55th parallel north intersected near Slusegaard.

After detailed surveys, the experts settled on a site in the dunes where Bornholm County subsequently donated a small facility with a compass card engraved in a sheet of granite and an information board, under the designation "Geographical Nodal Point".